Two Commissions 3D

SCS Press is proud to announce our first book contact has been offered to James Fazio, our Dean of Bible and Theology. His book is titled Two Commissions: Two Missionary Mandates in Matthew.

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james fazio book signingMatthew’s Gospel contains two discernible missionary mandates, where Christ sent His disciples to two different people groups with two evidently distinct messages. The command of Jesus to “Go therefore and make disciples of all the nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit” (Matt 28:19) is well known and oft repeated by Christians the world over. This missionary mandate has come to be commonly referred to as “the Great Commission.” However, there remains another commission with which the diligent reader of Scripture must come to terms.


“James Fazio has produced a brilliantly conceived thesis. While some dispensationalists will not agree with every point in this work, they will acknowledge that Matthew 10 and Matthew 28 are two distinct and different commissions. The commission of Matthew 10 is limited to Israel with a proclamation of the nearness of the kingdom. In Matthew 28 the commission is to go to the world with the message of Christ’s completed work on the cross. A very interesting read.”

Stanley D. Toussaint, Professor Emeritus,
Dallas Theological Seminary


“In this volume James Fazio wrestles with the puzzling fact that Matthew’s Jesus first tells his disciples not to take his message of the kingdom to the Gentiles (10:5) and tells the Canaanite woman that, “I was only sent to the lost sheep” (15:24). Only after his atoning work on the cross does he command the gospel to go to all nations (28:18–20). Did Jesus’ plans change? Was the kingdom that was offered to Israel different from that proclaimed by Paul and the apostles in Acts and the Epistles? What was Jesus offering Israel when he announced the kingdom (if indeed he already had the cross in mind)? Without necessarily siding with classical dispensationalism (which claims the kingdom was postponed because of Israel’s rejection), Fazio raises important questions that every responsible exegete of the Gospels must engage with. This volume challenged me again to think through these critical issues.”

Mark Strauss, Professor of New Testament
Bethel Seminary, San Diego


“Theological dialog between Christians of different traditions is very important. James Fazio, has written a book which helpfully highlights some of the key distinctives of Dispensational and Covenant theology. His work is charitable, and even-handed. As a Reformed Pastor, I commend this book as a gracious and open door to theological discussion!”

Adriel Sanchez, Pastor
North Park Presbyterian Church


“There is a theological fog that rolls in when there is a failure to observe the prominent change that took place part way through Christ’s earthly ministry. One of the issues that is affected by this is Christ’s commissions to His apostles. James Fazio’s book asks important questions and gives reasonable answers to the two commissions given by the Lord. This book will bring clarity to the gospel record as well as the scriptures that follow. Once again, theological ideas must emerge from solid exegesis rather than imposing its will on the biblical text.”

Dr. Paul Benware, Author/Speaker


“I wish more books were written in this manner.  Whether you agree or disagree with the points James Fazio makes in Two Commissions you’ll benefit from the biblical exegesis he uses to make them, and you’ll grow in an understanding of the Great Commission.”

Matt Smith, Pastor
Barabbas Road Church


“Two Commissions serves as a commission from author James Fazio, challenging the reader to think through the Gospel of Matthew critically!  In the frustrating tug-o-war of various theological camps, this work gives a balanced framework of the Gospel of Matthew.  I truly appreciate this book as the author presents the flow and structure of this wonderful gospel in a clear and palatable way.  A great read for the serious student of the Bible!”

Gunnar Hanson, Pastor
Valley Baptist Church


“James Fazio’s effort is to be commended for depth of scholarship, devotion to literal, contextual interpretation of texts, and respect toward those who have wrestled theologically with matters of continuity and discontinuity between Israel and the Church. Both covenant theologians and dispensationalists will profit from this thorough management of the two commissions of Jesus Christ. Though Matthew’s gospel has long been understood as the clearest presentation of dispensational shift from Israel to the Church, the author skillfully weaves commissional content from the other gospels and Acts so that a comprehensive assessment of the questions facing both covenant and dispensational views can be accomplished. Line upon line, precept upon precept…”

Brian Moulton, Professor of Biblical Studies
San Diego Christian College